Imported Debian patch 1.0.10-3 debian/1%1.0.10-3
authorSteinar H. Gunderson <sesse@debian.org>
Wed, 25 Oct 2006 09:50:52 +0000 (11:50 +0200)
committerBen Hutchings <ben@decadent.org.uk>
Wed, 14 Jul 2010 01:38:50 +0000 (02:38 +0100)
debian/README.Debian.nfsv4
debian/changelog
debian/nfs-common.init

index 25cb0e1..836a36d 100644 (file)
@@ -4,9 +4,10 @@ NFSv4 in Debian
 NFSv4 support in Debian is rather new, and not fully supported yet. If you want
 to experiment, make sure you have:
 
- - a recent 2.6 kernel on both client and server; newer is better. You might even
-   want to use CITI's patch set from http://www.citi.umich.edu/projects/nfsv4/linux/ 
-   on the server, and/or Trond Myklebust's patch set from http://client.linux-nfs.org/ .
+ - a recent 2.6 kernel on both client and server; newer is better. You might
+   even want to use CITI's patch set from
+   http://www.citi.umich.edu/projects/nfsv4/linux/ on the server, and/or Trond
+   Myklebust's patch set from http://client.linux-nfs.org/ .
  - a recent enough version of nfs-utils on both client and server (you probably
    have on at least one of them, since you're reading this file!).
  - enabled idmapd on both sides (see /etc/default/nfs-common).
@@ -19,13 +20,13 @@ to experiment, make sure you have:
    nfs         2049/udp                        # Network File System
 
 The export structure might be a bit confusing if you're already familiar with
-NFSv2 or NFSv3. The biggest difference is that you will need to export an explicit
-root of your pseudofilesystem, like this /etc/exports fragment:
+NFSv2 or NFSv3. The biggest difference is that you will need to export an
+explicit root of your pseudofilesystem, like this /etc/exports fragment:
 
   /nfs4                   hostname(rw,sync,fsid=0,crossmnt)
 
-(It doesn't need to be named "nfs4".) Then you can mount other volumes under that,
-like:
+(It doesn't need to be named "nfs4".) Then you can mount other volumes under
+that, like:
 
   /nfs4/music             hostname(rw,sync)
   /nfs4/movies            hostname(rw,sync)
@@ -34,8 +35,8 @@ Then your client can mount shares like this:
 
   mount -t nfs4 server:/music /mnt/music
 
-Since you might not have everything under one root, you might want /nfs4/* on the
-server to be bind mounts, ie.:
+Since you might not have everything under one root, you might want /nfs4/* on
+the server to be bind mounts, ie.:
 
   mount --bind /srv/music /nfs4/music
 
@@ -59,4 +60,10 @@ If you use "gss/krb5i", you will also get integrity (ie. authentication), and
 with "gss/krb5p", you'll also get privacy (ie. encryption). Make sure your
 kernel supports this; not all kernels do.
 
+If you receive messages on the server complaining about "client ID already in
+use" when mounting from more than one client, check your /etc/hosts; if your
+hostname resolves to a non-global IP (like 127.0.0.1 or 127.0.1.1, or if you
+are behind NAT) this will cause such problems currently, and you will need to
+change or remove it for NFSv4 mounts to work correctly.
+
  -- Steinar H. Gunderson <sesse@debian.org>, Wed, 11 Oct 2006 15:18:03 +0200
index 6b3bda1..d4fcc39 100644 (file)
@@ -1,3 +1,14 @@
+nfs-utils (1:1.0.10-3) unstable; urgency=low
+
+  * Copy the do_modprobe() definition from nfs-kernel-server.init to
+    nfs-common.init, fixing spurious warnings when running a non-modular
+    kernel. (Closes: #394810)
+  * Wrap README.Debian.nfsv4 at 80 columns. (Closes: #394916)
+  * In README.Debian.nfsv4, added a note about /etc/hosts entries containing
+    non-global IP addresses.
+
+ -- Steinar H. Gunderson <sesse@debian.org>  Wed, 25 Oct 2006 11:50:52 +0200
+
 nfs-utils (1:1.0.10-2) unstable; urgency=low
 
   * Remove leftover log file from the .diff.gz.
index f3ebbd1..e9cb4ca 100644 (file)
@@ -112,7 +112,10 @@ esac
 [ -x /usr/sbin/rpc.gssd     ] || [ "$NEED_GSSD"   = no ] || exit 0
 
 do_modprobe() {
-    modprobe -q "$1" || true
+    if [ -x /sbin/modprobe -a -f /proc/modules ]
+    then
+        modprobe -q "$1" || true
+    fi
 }
 
 do_mount() {