Statd should always 'chdir' to its state directory.
authorNeilBrown <neilb@suse.de>
Thu, 21 Jul 2011 18:23:00 +0000 (14:23 -0400)
committerLuk Claes <luk@debian.org>
Sun, 2 Oct 2011 14:16:46 +0000 (16:16 +0200)
s statd can be started by 'mount' which can sometimes be run by a
normal user, the current-working-directory could be anything.  In
partcular it could be in a mounted filesystem.  As 'statd' continues
running as a daemon it could keep prevent that filesystem from being
unmounted.

statd does currently 'chdir' to the state directory, but only if the
state directory is not owned by root.  This is wrong - it should check
for root after the chdir, not before.

So swap the two if statements around.

Signed-off-by: NeilBrown <neilb@suse.de>
Signed-off-by: Steve Dickson <steved@redhat.com>
support/nsm/file.c

index 98b47bf..a12c753 100644 (file)
@@ -395,18 +395,18 @@ nsm_drop_privileges(const int pidfd)
                return false;
        }
 
-       if (st.st_uid == 0) {
-               xlog_warn("Running as root.  "
-                       "chown %s to choose different user", nsm_base_dirname);
-               return true;
-       }
-
        if (chdir(nsm_base_dirname) == -1) {
                xlog(L_ERROR, "Failed to change working directory to %s: %m",
                                nsm_base_dirname);
                return false;
        }
 
+       if (st.st_uid == 0) {
+               xlog_warn("Running as root.  "
+                       "chown %s to choose different user", nsm_base_dirname);
+               return true;
+       }
+
        /*
         * If the pidfile happens to reside on NFS, dropping privileges
         * will probably cause us to lose access, even though we are